Class 5 Labels & Placards

The class 5 labels & placards

class 5 labels

Class 5 Dangerous Goods

There are two sub-divisions for Class 5 Dangerous Goods:

Class 5.1 Oxidizing substances

Oxidizing substances are those which, while in themselves not necessarily combustible, may, generally by yielding oxygen, cause, or contribute to, the combustion of other material. Because of their high oxygen content, these are often reactive materials.  They may react with other flammable or combustible materials and generate heat, leading to fires, which the oxidizing agents will supply with oxygen which keeps them burning without any help from oxygen in the air (as is the case with normal combustion).

Such fires may, therefore, break out and continue in confined spaces, e.g. inside cargo holds.  And once started, they may be difficult to extinguish.  Blanketing with powder or foam is useless, as the oxygen is already present in the agent underneath. The only method is to use a large amount of cold water, but if the fire is in an enclosed space, it may be difficult to reach, and the heat generated is such that a very large amount of water may be needed.

Some oxidizers can be explosive if heated strongly, particularly in the presence of carbon.  Ammonium nitrate (a readily available farm fertiliser) mixed with hydrocarbon oil, e.g. diesel, becomes a powerful explosive, much used in the extractive industries, and often by terrorists.

Class 5.2 Organic peroxides

Organic peroxides substances contain carbon (organic) structures linked by a double oxygen bond (peroxide).  Thus the fuel and the oxygen are together in the same molecule, making them even more liable to ignition than a separate combustible material.

They are designed to be reactive for a number of industrial purposes, and may consequently be unstable, and sometimes explosive.  When they are first developed, they may be classified as either Class 1 or Class 5.2 generally depending on the intended end-use.  On the basis of their chemical structure alone, they could be considered as either.

Because of their reactive nature, they can be very damaging to the human body, particularly the eyes and may have one or more of the following properties:

  • be liable to explosive decomposition;
  • burn rapidly;
  • be sensitive to impact or friction;
  • react dangerously with other substances;
  • cause damage to the eyes.

Organic peroxides often have to be maintained under refrigeration to keep them inactive, and then the temperature must be carefully controlled.  Otherwise, if they exceed a certain temperature specific to the material, they will start to decompose rapidly, similar to the self-reactive materials in Class 4.1, resulting in uncontrollable progress towards fire or explosion.

Commonly transported class 5 dangerous goods include swimming pool chemicals and fertilizers.

 

Class 5 LABELs- SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGES

class 5 labels dimensions

ADR (Road), IATA (Air) and IMDG (Sea) regulations state that all packages containing dangerous goods must have a warning label and that the label must be in the form of a square set at an angle of 45° (diamond shaped).

Class 5 labels for packages must be at least 100 x 100mm, from edge to edge, and they must show a dotted outer boundary line (unless being applied on a background of contrasting colour).  The class number ‘5.1’ or ‘5.2’ must be shown in the bottom corner and be in text at least 12mm high. Additional text saying ‘Oxidizing Agent’ may be shown in the bottom half of the 5.1 label, but this is not mandatory.

The inner black line of the Class 5 labels must be at least two millimetres thick and there must be a gap of 5mm between this and the outer dotted border or the outer edge of the label. The upper half of the class 5 label must contain the relevant symbol.

Class 5 Placard SPECIFICATIONS

class 5 placard dimensions

The Class 5 placard is used for cargo transport units such as freight containers and road/rail tanker vehicles.

Class 5 placards must be at least 250mm x 250mm, from edge to edge, and set at an angle of 45°. The placard must show a dotted outer boundary line (unless being applied on a background of contrasting colour).  The class number ‘5’ must be shown in the bottom corner and be in text at least 25mm high.  Additional text saying ‘Oxidizing Agent’ may be shown in the bottom half of the 5.1 placard.

There is no specification for the thickness of the inner line on placards, as yet, but there must be a gap of 12.5mm between this and the outer dotted border or the outer edge of the label.  The upper half of the label must contain the relevant symbol.

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All Class 5 labels and placards manufactured by Hibiscus Plc, comply with IATA/ ICAO, UN ADR/RID and IMDG/IMO requirements, and are made from materials that meet the strict BS5609 standard.  BS5609 is a specification for labels that are intended for marine use, whereby both the ink and the substrate must be able to withstand 3 months continuous immersion in sea-water and still be legible and have good adhesion.

We manufacture Class 5 labels at 101 x 101mm on rolls of 250, and as single cut labels at 100x100mm. Class 5 placards, for use in international transportation, are supplied at 250x250mm and 200x200mm for UK transport only.

 

This article should not be used in substitution for checking the exact requirements in the applicable modal regulations.

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